Some people often reveal the bondage of race they suffer. Their words exculpate us from responsibility and indict whites for every possible action they undertake. I had the opportunity to see this phenomenon uncovering both dishonesty and self-deception as I heard MSNBC guest Joy-Ann Reid suggesting that  Mitt Romney was racist for helping an African American woman he met while on the campaign-trail by giving her some money from his wallet.

As it turns out, Mrs. Ruth Williams said she was praying for God to guide her with a payment of a late electric bill. Unexpectedly, she saw the Romney tour bus. After talking to Romney about her troubles, we learned that Romney gave the woman approximately $50 to help her pay the electric bill.

Incredibly, Ann Reid called Romney’s act condescending and patronizing.  What was Romney supposed to do?  What would satisfy the MSNBC guest. According to what she said, nothing short than offering full support for more government programs!  Here you can read it yourself:

“As an African-American woman, it galls me. I don’t even like to watch it. I felt like it plays into every sort of patronizing stereotype of black people. Oh, here’s this little lady, let me give her 50 bucks. I mean, this is the guy who offered a bet of $10,000 on stage, you know, to another candidate, but, you know, here, let me lay off 50 bucks on this woman. And I think it plays into that conservative meme that you don’t need actual programs that the government puts in place to help people in need, we’ll just give them charity. The church will take care of them, I’ll give them 50 bucks.”

As Romney has money, he could have given thousands to the woman. But that would not do. In fact, Romney would be accused of more condescension as what we need is social justice, not charity. Only by becoming a leftist, big-government advocate would Romney cease to be an anti-poor racist. Most conservatives do not say we do not need social programs, we just simply reject Federal intrusion on these issues, as there is no constitutional mandate. That something needs to be done does not mean the Federal government needs to do it. Besides, we believe that these needs are best attended by basic communities such as churches, non-profits, and local governments.

How is this a stereotype?  A woman approaches Romney asking for help. She did not go to a government agency but to Romney. The Democrats are in charge and they are all for these government programs, no? Well, what is she doing asking for help?  We do not know but she asked for help. Are we aware of anything else Romney may choose to do?  No. Was Romney taken by surprise by the unusual request and acted immediately moved by compassion?  Maybe.

We all have been approached by people asking for help. It happens all the time. Must we take such instances as evidence for a great need for increases in Federal involvement with programs offering subsidies or cash gifts? No. The manner we choose to attend the needs of people is certainly an important area of discernment about how to help those in need. Some people who ask are truly in need, others are looking for an enabler. But for those captive by race consciousness, every instance is an opportunity to score a cheap point.

What say you?

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